Everyone’s asked themselves that age old question, the one that sits in the back of your mind most of your young adult life but you’re almost too afraid to say it out loud; could I make it as a freelancer? Because my life would be so much better if I were freelance, right?

You’re *insert age here* and you love what you do, but there are certain constraints to the job that just don’t make you happy, and working for yourself may solve most of these head scratching problems. Maybe you know someone else in your field who went freelance and they’re bossing it. Or maybe it’s just always been you dream to own your own business, but the idea of actually doing it just fills you with nervous energy.

Believe it or not, I have been there; back in 2013 when I graduated University there was nothing that filled me with more dread than logging onto that HMRC portal and signing up as a registered business. Forging those initial pathways as a photographer was one of the hardest things I’ve had to do. There aren’t too many employable options; you could go in-house for someone, but then depending on the company or brand your options for growth are quite limited. Or you could assist a more mature photographer with gallons of experience, and trust me I did my fair share of assisting, but following someone around with light boxes and picking up lunch orders was never really for me. My only ever real or plausible option was going freelance, but I don’t think I ever realised what that truly meant until I was in the thick of it.

“But Georgie, why are you writing this now? No one wants to hear about you or your story” I can hear my inner critic calling out to me. Do you have an inner critic? This is something that resonated with me from one of my female business-boss idols Lola Hoad (of the *One Girl Band podcast). She talks about her inner critic, Barb, and how every freelancer has that internal voice that is forever berating every creative or brilliant idea you ever have. Well, my inner critic is more of a Helen; whenever Helen creeps up and tells me I’m not good, strong or intelligent enough to own my own business or be successful in the thing I am passionate about, I have to take a deep breath, acknowledge how I’m feeling, but remember how sodding important it is I push on anyway.

I’m pretty sure this realism is one that every business owner has, embracing failure but just doing it anyway. Because if you don’t do those things that fulfil you, are you ever really living?

I’ve had countless of those rock-bottom moments when you’re not quite sure what you’re doing with your life. Having to deal with imposter syndrome on a daily basis, not knowing if you’ll make your next mortgage bill, questioning your worth, eating beans on toast for the fifth time that week, having a screaming match with your parent/friend/significant other because you’ve worked another 13 hour day and they just want to spend a little time with you, but you’ve still got so much work to do. Sound familiar?

Freelancing is so often glamourised to be different than what it really is; the grass is greener kind of attitude, and that most of it is easy-living. I refuse to sell you that rose-tinted dream. Since my **podcast interview with my beautiful friend Kat Horrocks so many truly talented individuals have approached me to tell me how inspiring I am, how they look up to me and my achievements, and how they hope to be as successful as I am one day. This is flattering, and fills me with so much joy I’m almost bursting at the seams. I want to inspire you to set your sights high, but make sure you’re prepared for change and constant learning. Be proud of your growth and also be prepared for those pitfalls along the way.

You will have to learn so many elements of business to become a freelancer, as I have done. This has only made me stronger and feathered the strings to my bow. I am not just a photographer; I am a businesswoman, accountant, marketeer, social media guru, events coordinator, networker, copyrighter, debt collector… you can imagine the list goes on.

Yet I am still learning every day.

There is no end game and there is no final major project. I can hear the words of my lecturer Trudie ringing in my ears: “Do you ever really stop learning? Your final major project is not your final project here at University, it’s the very last thing you do before you die…” and if you think you’re the best, will you ever really grow to be more? You need to learn to not be bullied by your inner critic but also to never get too big for your boots.

Being freelance really is a rollercoaster. I do hope that each and every one of you who aspires to own your own business achieves your goals, and that your dreams of being freelance really do come true. But I feel like I’d be doing you a disservice if I didn’t warn you how fucking terrifying it is at times.

Does this make it not worth it?
Do I wish I’d taken an easier path with my life?
Do I regret being freelance?

No.
Not one single day.

*Want to listen to Lola Hoad’s One Girl Band Podcast? Click here.
**Want to check out my interview I did with Kat for her Put Yourself First Podcast? Click here.

All images in this post are shot by the extremely talented Adriana at @Adrianasphoto

All Rights Reserved - Georgie Glass 2018 ®

I never used to be that boring friend; the friend who needs to stay in on a Saturday night to save money. The friend who can’t come out for dinner as they ‘already have one social event booked in for this week, and you’ll just have to wait until next’ – sound familiar? It will, if you’re a young homeowner.

In the premise of giving you guys a little insight into my life, I thought I’d give you the 4/11 into owning a home. I’m 25, I live alone, I own my own gaff. It’s got its ups, but Jesus, it’s got its downs. Don’t get me wrong, owning my own home has always been my dream. I remember when I was little, and people used to ask me what I wanted to do when I grew up, owning a place to call my own was up there, straight after being a photographer and a fairy princess… but it’s so much harder than I ever imagined it would be.

Being a young couple, & owning your first home with your partner is a completley different kettle of fish; don’t get me wrong, I am not belittling the worries of other young homeowners. But being able to lean on your significant other for support sounds to me, blissful.

In upcoming posts on this blog, I am going to provide aid, support and tips for other independents out their, who are owning their own little piece of heaven (or hell, depending on what day you catch me on…). I’ll be passing on whatever wisdom or shortcomings I run into, making sure you all learn from my mistakes. For now, take these three factoids with you, just to give you a little taster of what’s to come.

1. Get Organised

Snooze-fest, I know, but becoming organised when it comes to your home really will become your best friend. If you’re like me and you work for yourself then you’ll know that routine doesn’t really come as second nature to us freelancers. Constructing order and keeping to a timetable is literally my worst enemy, and I am a sucker for not keeping consistency. The human race are creatures of habit; not matter how much you try to convince yourself that you love to be spontaneous I know deep down you love a bit of routine, you can’t kid a kidder.

It could be something big like keeping a record on your calendar of the dates your bills go out. With reminders two days before to actually make sure you have enough money in your current account (don’t pretend like you haven’t been there). Or it could be something really small, like washing your clothes the same days each week (mine are Mondays and Thursdays, thanks for asking…). Adding this element of organisation to how you keep your home will act as respite in the future, I promise.

2. Know Your Money

Us Brits love to be stuffy about money; people don’t like talking about it, or even thinking about it for that matter. It’s so easy to stick your head in the sand and think “Oh I’ll just got out for that Nando’s, I’ll deal with the repercussions later…” Right? Wrong.

Making that transition from happy go lucky teenager to responsible young earner is so difficult. Cutting out those frivolous purchases at Primark so you can save money for the gas and electric bill is so depressing.

What I like to do to beat those budget blues is at the beginning of the month estimate how much money you have coming in, and then what you’ll have coming out across different days for your bills in that month. Put a little aside for a rainy day if you want to, and then take a look at what you’ve got left – your ‘fun’ money if you will (a fond term a picked up from a friend…) Then, divide your ‘fun’ money by how many weeks there are in that month; for example January is a 4 and a half week month, so if you know you have £300 fun money, that’s £66.67 each week for that month, that you can spend on whatever you like.

3. Don’t be Afraid to Ask for Help

Being afraid of picking up the phone is crippling; and something I myself suffer with. Whether it be a small cry for help, or a ‘Lost Season One’ kind of wail until you feel yourself breaking down, kind of call for help, either way, don’t be afraid to ask.
I’m not saying ask for money, these are two very different subjects, what I am saying is don’t be embarrassed to say your struggling. The responsibility of owning a house, bricks and mortar in your name, is HUGE. Sometimes the magnitude of this massive thing can be too much to bare. I know, the times I have opened up to my family, friends or my boyfriend about how I’ve been feeling about a situation has really helped lighten the load. Usually, they don’t have the answer; but being able to share in confidence always helps me feel a little lighter, and sometimes talking it through can help shed the light on the solution.

I really hope this post has enlightened you a little into my life – and what I hope to bring you guys across my blog in 2018. If you have any questions or own your own home and want to share some of your tips, please pop me a comment below.
Now don’t mind me, I’ll just be over here, pretending to be a fairy princess…

All Rights Reserved - Georgie Glass 2018 ®