Why have I embarked on 365?

Have you ever stopped long enough to look back over your decisions to wonder why the hell you made them in the first place?

day 1

It’s this strange crossroads type of place where you look back over your time, life choices and, in my case, work and feel happy about the decisions you’ve made, but know you can do better. Well, that’s kind of where I was at just over 2 months ago, when I made the decision to undertake a 365 Project.

If you frequent my website a lot you’ll have noticed I’ve not been around for a little while – I’ve not been gone, just absent, beavering away debating my next move. As artists we’re constantly looking for creativity to inspire us, usually in everyday life. But my life has been so full of the everyday mundane and routine recently that I’ve not felt full of inspiration.

day 3

“I was filled with content that I thought my audience wanted to see, rather than what I really wanted to create…”

Instead my mind has been full of thoughts like “the mortgage will go out in two weeks…” or “I need to be at this place at this time, and it’s imperative I’m not late” and more usually “I need to complete X amount of work, walk the dog, plan meals for the week, go to the gym, be a healthy adult, and make sure I am a fully functioning human being” without imploding… probably all sounds too familiar if you’re a freelancer*, like me.

day 25

But in January I made the conscious decision to become a solo blogger; define that as you will, I don’t really think I really knew what journey I was undergoing when I made that choice. I was filled with content that I thought my audience wanted to see, rather than what I really wanted to create. And to be honest if you’d of point blank asked me what I actually wanted to be putting out there into the ether I probably would of said, “ermmm can you come back to me on that one later? Cheers…”

“I felt like I was losing my identity, and becoming this new dis-functional version of myself…”

day 19

I was in this extremely weird Alice in Wonderland type place. I was invited to plenty of incredible events and experiencing awesome things in Manchester, however not really creating the content I wanted to see, but instead what would gain me a bigger following. I was too tuned into my numbers, and not my work. As as a photographer, that really wasn’t where my head was supposed to be at. It took a massive smack in the face, to make me wake up and smell the social dissatisfaction to realise, hey, I’m not actually all that happy with my content I’m over here creating. Who am I again?

day 24

I felt like I was losing my identity, and becoming this new dis-functional version of myself. Not enough of one thing, and not even too much of the other, just in this strange grey muggy area in the middle. I wasn’t sure what road I was on, or who I was actually becoming, all I knew was that I remember who I wanted to be. That same person I wanted to become when I was 13 years old, a photographer.

Okay okay, enough of the rambling, you want to know what this will mean for you, the reader, right?

Well all it really means is the content you’re going to see moving forward is going to be a lot more curated to what I want, and not what I think you guys want – as if it isn’t coming from a truer version of me, you guys are going to see straight through that, right?

Hence forth the ‘365 project’!

day 26

If you follow me on Instagram you’ll of noticed that my 365 photo-project is already underway, the morning I post this with you, I’m already on day 68 and I’m loving it! All the content will of been shot by yours truly, and it will not only serve as a platform where I showcase my best work, personal and professional for the next 365 days, but also a place to be my true creative self, and just be who I want to be. How does that sound ey? #deep #deeperthanEyalonLoveIsland

The blog will follow in the footsteps of the 365 project; it’ll be home to a little bit more than just photographs but ultimately it’s here to achieve the same goals – to showcase my best photographic work, and act as an extension of my portfolios (which you can view here, if you like).

day 36

And that’s it! I mean, don’t get me wrong I did expect some kind of ‘Welcome Back’ banner, a cake, a sing-song, but whatever… I’ll just take the fact you’re here reading this as my gift. This is my triumphant return to blogging! Hope to see a lot more of you, my readers, as we move ahead into this new time for my content. And you can look forward to seeing many more photographs like these featured in today’s post from my 365 project, as I move forward with the blog.

Peace, love & stuff… x

www.georgieglass.co.uk

* – If you haven’t already checked out my blog post about ‘What Being Freelance Means to Me” then please do, just click here.

All Rights Reserved - Georgie Glass 2018 ®

When you see someone successful it’s easy to think that its all come effortlessly to them. Why is this so? When that’s rarely the case, especially with professional women. In this series I hope to explore the professional realms of different working women, how they’ve got to where they are today, and what nuggets of wisdom we can be empowered by moving forward with our own careers.

This is a monthly catalogue of question and answer interviews, called the Working Woman Series. I hope you enjoy reading these pieces, as much as I enjoyed interviewing these inspiring women.

February brings us such an exciting installment of the Working Woman Series, well it certainly is for me anyway, as this lady is someone I’ve looked up to and followed for an awfully long time.
Rebecca Warriner is a 27 year old photographer and blogger who resides in the beautiful Nottingham countryside. Lesser known day to day by her full name, if you know Rebecca you’ll know her by her online alias, From Roses. As Rebecca is a full time beauty and lifestyle blogger, she dedicates her days creating beautiful online content for the everyday girl. From skincare to style, and even to mental health, collaborating with brands on campaigns and projects. Rebecca shares with us her insights into the day to day, and everything that life may throw at us.

Now time to geek off a little; Rebecca’s skills as a photographer don’t just come down to a keen eye and beautiful styling; She graduated from University with a first class honors degree in Photography with Editorial & Advertising. Now anyone could know this (as she does tell us so on her website) however, I know all this as Rebecca and I actually graduated from the same University, from the very same course, just one year apart.
It’s a real treat for me to have her as part of this series, as following her career develop over the years since Uni has been such a pleasure, and she’s been such an inspiration to me. I’m not even sure Rebecca knows about my girl-boss crush, but what a time to tell her ey?

All embarrassment aside, Rebecca tells me more about her career has developed and changed over the years “…When I came out of university I went to work with my sister as a classroom assistant… During that time I had some health issues flare up leading me to take 11 months out of the work place, and due to complications I became self-employed. I did little photography jobs and then started up an online magazine with a close friend which we ran for a couple of years. During that time I was constantly blogging still and building up my audience. When we closed the magazine that’s when I decided I wanted to run the blog full time.”

And if all the reasons above aren’t enough to compel you to keep reading, have you heard about her gorgeous pooch Josie..?

If this doesn’t get you reading, I don’t know what will.

***

What’s the best piece of career advice you’ve ever been given?

Your job isn’t to answer e-mails’. I’m an absolute slave to my inbox and can get lost in it for hours but that isn’t the only thing I have to focus on. Everybody seems to constantly talk about e-mails but it’s not my full time job. 

What’s your on-the-go snack for when you’re out and about on a busy day?

Right now, I’m really into apples. Last year I stopped eating fruit for health reasons and I’m so slowly working it back into my diet and thoroughly enjoying it.

How do you balance your personal life with work?

To be honest, I don’t. It’s still something I struggle with and having a boyfriend who on average spends a good 9/10 months away from home it’s meant that I’ve developed an odd work pattern as I’ve become so used to having my time completely to myself. This year saw a big change though and I’ve struggled striking a balance, so each day I try to have at least 1 hour where I’m not sat on a screen. It’s something I’m constantly working towards and it changes constantly but I certainly struggle.

What maxims do you live or work by?

‘You do you’ – for so long I was so consumed by what other people were doing it controlled my life and was such an unhealthy pattern to get into. Focusing on myself and letting other people do the same has made me so much happier.

What is your favourite Instagram account? Why?

I mean, obviously my dogs Instagram is one of my favourites because she’s the light of my life (@josiethewhippie) but as that’s completely biased. I have to say right now @rebecca.kathryn, she’s somebody who I’ve connected with as we both have whippet crosses and they’re totally unique, she’s an illustrator and just a generally lovely person to speak to.

Do you feel there is inequality in the workplace in 2018? If so, what can be done to inspire young people to break this?

As I don’t work in a traditional environment I feel like I can’t answer this properly. But in the blogging world, certainly not. There are so many issues in this industry that have to be tackled, issues with being paid, spoken to and treated like absolute garbage by the vast majority of people and so many more things to deal with on a daily basis. As a predominately female industry in general it seems to be treated as an easy life, a simple career that is a luxury.

How do you respond to other people’s reaction to your career success? Whether it be positive or negative?

In general, I think whenever people find out what I do their response is generally pretty similar. They ask me how I make money, is it real job and then just general queries of how it works. As it’s still something that is so new, people are fascinated.

What career set backs have you had to overcome? And what have you learned from them?

One of the biggest ones is to make sure you can pay your bills. In 2016 I made a big financial loss due to companies going bankrupt. That made me realise when you’re your own boss and you’re in charge of everything, you have to be smart with your money. 

What are three things in your work arsenal that you just couldn’t live without?

My camera, my MacBook and probably my phone. Without them I wouldn’t be able to do my job, if I can add in a bonus one i’d say it’d be a notepad, as I’d also be lost without my lists.

What’s your biggest goal for the next year ahead?

Probably to find a little more a balance and take more time away from my work. And also just to embrace work and keep on doing what I’m doing and make it as awesome as I possibly can.

Inspired by Rebecca’s career? Reach out to her on Instagram.
@fromrosesxo

All photographs are credited to Rebecca herself.

All Rights Reserved - Georgie Glass 2018 ®

Everyone’s asked themselves that age old question, the one that sits in the back of your mind most of your young adult life but you’re almost too afraid to say it out loud; could I make it as a freelancer? Because my life would be so much better if I were freelance, right?

You’re *insert age here* and you love what you do, but there are certain constraints to the job that just don’t make you happy, and working for yourself may solve most of these head scratching problems. Maybe you know someone else in your field who went freelance and they’re bossing it. Or maybe it’s just always been you dream to own your own business, but the idea of actually doing it just fills you with nervous energy.

Believe it or not, I have been there; back in 2013 when I graduated University there was nothing that filled me with more dread than logging onto that HMRC portal and signing up as a registered business. Forging those initial pathways as a photographer was one of the hardest things I’ve had to do. There aren’t too many employable options; you could go in-house for someone, but then depending on the company or brand your options for growth are quite limited. Or you could assist a more mature photographer with gallons of experience, and trust me I did my fair share of assisting, but following someone around with light boxes and picking up lunch orders was never really for me. My only ever real or plausible option was going freelance, but I don’t think I ever realised what that truly meant until I was in the thick of it.

“But Georgie, why are you writing this now? No one wants to hear about you or your story” I can hear my inner critic calling out to me. Do you have an inner critic? This is something that resonated with me from one of my female business-boss idols Lola Hoad (of the *One Girl Band podcast). She talks about her inner critic, Barb, and how every freelancer has that internal voice that is forever berating every creative or brilliant idea you ever have. Well, my inner critic is more of a Helen; whenever Helen creeps up and tells me I’m not good, strong or intelligent enough to own my own business or be successful in the thing I am passionate about, I have to take a deep breath, acknowledge how I’m feeling, but remember how sodding important it is I push on anyway.

I’m pretty sure this realism is one that every business owner has, embracing failure but just doing it anyway. Because if you don’t do those things that fulfil you, are you ever really living?

I’ve had countless of those rock-bottom moments when you’re not quite sure what you’re doing with your life. Having to deal with imposter syndrome on a daily basis, not knowing if you’ll make your next mortgage bill, questioning your worth, eating beans on toast for the fifth time that week, having a screaming match with your parent/friend/significant other because you’ve worked another 13 hour day and they just want to spend a little time with you, but you’ve still got so much work to do. Sound familiar?

Freelancing is so often glamourised to be different than what it really is; the grass is greener kind of attitude, and that most of it is easy-living. I refuse to sell you that rose-tinted dream. Since my **podcast interview with my beautiful friend Kat Horrocks so many truly talented individuals have approached me to tell me how inspiring I am, how they look up to me and my achievements, and how they hope to be as successful as I am one day. This is flattering, and fills me with so much joy I’m almost bursting at the seams. I want to inspire you to set your sights high, but make sure you’re prepared for change and constant learning. Be proud of your growth and also be prepared for those pitfalls along the way.

You will have to learn so many elements of business to become a freelancer, as I have done. This has only made me stronger and feathered the strings to my bow. I am not just a photographer; I am a businesswoman, accountant, marketeer, social media guru, events coordinator, networker, copyrighter, debt collector… you can imagine the list goes on.

Yet I am still learning every day.

There is no end game and there is no final major project. I can hear the words of my lecturer Trudie ringing in my ears: “Do you ever really stop learning? Your final major project is not your final project here at University, it’s the very last thing you do before you die…” and if you think you’re the best, will you ever really grow to be more? You need to learn to not be bullied by your inner critic but also to never get too big for your boots.

Being freelance really is a rollercoaster. I do hope that each and every one of you who aspires to own your own business achieves your goals, and that your dreams of being freelance really do come true. But I feel like I’d be doing you a disservice if I didn’t warn you how fucking terrifying it is at times.

Does this make it not worth it?
Do I wish I’d taken an easier path with my life?
Do I regret being freelance?

No.
Not one single day.

*Want to listen to Lola Hoad’s One Girl Band Podcast? Click here.
**Want to check out my interview I did with Kat for her Put Yourself First Podcast? Click here.

All images in this post are shot by the extremely talented Adriana at @Adrianasphoto

All Rights Reserved - Georgie Glass 2018 ®

As a blogger it’s common knowledge that when we dine out the first thing we pick up isn’t our knife and fork, it’s our iPhone. That eating out with another blogger holds a sense of relief because you reach for your *insert model of mobile phone here* at exactly the same time. Or that dining out with friends or a loved one brings a sense of nervousness because you don’t know how far into the meal you have until the dreaded timer goes off and your significant other will say “have you finished yet?”

The thought of an off switch frightens me; my boyfriend Jon and I have desperately tried to implement rules at night time so that at “9pm work stops, 10pm mobile phones go down”. But if you’re a blogger, vlogger or social influencer, you’ll know that sticking to those kind of rules creates more anxiety than it does relief. It was just the same when I was shooting food for a living, but now I have added the role of ‘blogger’ to my repertoire it just seems to have stepped up a notch.

If something comes onto our radar at bedtime, why is it as important as say an email coming through at 9:33am? Is it really that we have to deal with it at that very second, or is it just an addiction? Or a fear that something we’ve worked so hard to build up could come crashing down within a matter of hours. I like to think it’s the latter, but as of late I’m not so sure.

Last night Jon & I were kindly invited down to eat at the new COSMO restaurant on Deansgate, and thats where this whole notion got me thinking, “where’s the line?” Don’t get me wrong, Jon is so understanding. If we go anywhere, and it’s for work, he just totally gets it, lets me do my own thing, and then we enjoy our lovely meal (like we did last night). But I often leave a meal with Jon with a sense of guilt if I’ve been working on my phone; “have I neglected him?” – “does he feel like an after thought?” – “does he really know how grateful I am that he came with me tonight?”. More often than not, these fears are completley self-inflicted, and if I ever were to communicate how I feel, I know he would only ever receive me with reassurance.


Images from our dinner at Cosmo Deansgate (replaced the old Red Hot World Buffet) last night – 13/01/18

First world problems, right? I know, I can hear these words ringing in my ears as I write this piece. Don’t mistake what I am saying, I am extremely grateful for every single opportunity that I am given as a blogger & creative in Manchester. It’s just last night’s ‘date night’ meal got me thinking is all this social media engagement stopping me from engaging with my own boyfriend on a night out? I want to remain present to my audience, but I also want to be in the moment with him.

I’m not going to stop inviting Jon with me to lovely experiences, as I want him there with me by my side. However I think implementing rules and boundaries isn’t such a bad idea either. Take all your snaps for social media, but then put the phone down and upload them later or the next morning, and just enjoy being with someone, and not a keypad. Write a list before 9pm of everything that needs to be done tomorrow, and then put your phone on Do Not Disturb or silent. I think Jon and I are going to start having a phone-less date night once a month – where we both leave our phones at home and just be with each other, because that moment is just for us, I don’t need to share that with anyone else but him.

Do you struggle to switch off?
What tactics do you have to power-down at the end of a long day?
Do you have a set of rules with your own significant other?

I’d love to know! Let me know in the comments below.

All Rights Reserved - Georgie Glass 2018 ®

I never used to be that boring friend; the friend who needs to stay in on a Saturday night to save money. The friend who can’t come out for dinner as they ‘already have one social event booked in for this week, and you’ll just have to wait until next’ – sound familiar? It will, if you’re a young homeowner.

In the premise of giving you guys a little insight into my life, I thought I’d give you the 4/11 into owning a home. I’m 25, I live alone, I own my own gaff. It’s got its ups, but Jesus, it’s got its downs. Don’t get me wrong, owning my own home has always been my dream. I remember when I was little, and people used to ask me what I wanted to do when I grew up, owning a place to call my own was up there, straight after being a photographer and a fairy princess… but it’s so much harder than I ever imagined it would be.

Being a young couple, & owning your first home with your partner is a completley different kettle of fish; don’t get me wrong, I am not belittling the worries of other young homeowners. But being able to lean on your significant other for support sounds to me, blissful.

In upcoming posts on this blog, I am going to provide aid, support and tips for other independents out their, who are owning their own little piece of heaven (or hell, depending on what day you catch me on…). I’ll be passing on whatever wisdom or shortcomings I run into, making sure you all learn from my mistakes. For now, take these three factoids with you, just to give you a little taster of what’s to come.

1. Get Organised

Snooze-fest, I know, but becoming organised when it comes to your home really will become your best friend. If you’re like me and you work for yourself then you’ll know that routine doesn’t really come as second nature to us freelancers. Constructing order and keeping to a timetable is literally my worst enemy, and I am a sucker for not keeping consistency. The human race are creatures of habit; not matter how much you try to convince yourself that you love to be spontaneous I know deep down you love a bit of routine, you can’t kid a kidder.

It could be something big like keeping a record on your calendar of the dates your bills go out. With reminders two days before to actually make sure you have enough money in your current account (don’t pretend like you haven’t been there). Or it could be something really small, like washing your clothes the same days each week (mine are Mondays and Thursdays, thanks for asking…). Adding this element of organisation to how you keep your home will act as respite in the future, I promise.

2. Know Your Money

Us Brits love to be stuffy about money; people don’t like talking about it, or even thinking about it for that matter. It’s so easy to stick your head in the sand and think “Oh I’ll just got out for that Nando’s, I’ll deal with the repercussions later…” Right? Wrong.

Making that transition from happy go lucky teenager to responsible young earner is so difficult. Cutting out those frivolous purchases at Primark so you can save money for the gas and electric bill is so depressing.

What I like to do to beat those budget blues is at the beginning of the month estimate how much money you have coming in, and then what you’ll have coming out across different days for your bills in that month. Put a little aside for a rainy day if you want to, and then take a look at what you’ve got left – your ‘fun’ money if you will (a fond term a picked up from a friend…) Then, divide your ‘fun’ money by how many weeks there are in that month; for example January is a 4 and a half week month, so if you know you have £300 fun money, that’s £66.67 each week for that month, that you can spend on whatever you like.

3. Don’t be Afraid to Ask for Help

Being afraid of picking up the phone is crippling; and something I myself suffer with. Whether it be a small cry for help, or a ‘Lost Season One’ kind of wail until you feel yourself breaking down, kind of call for help, either way, don’t be afraid to ask.
I’m not saying ask for money, these are two very different subjects, what I am saying is don’t be embarrassed to say your struggling. The responsibility of owning a house, bricks and mortar in your name, is HUGE. Sometimes the magnitude of this massive thing can be too much to bare. I know, the times I have opened up to my family, friends or my boyfriend about how I’ve been feeling about a situation has really helped lighten the load. Usually, they don’t have the answer; but being able to share in confidence always helps me feel a little lighter, and sometimes talking it through can help shed the light on the solution.

I really hope this post has enlightened you a little into my life – and what I hope to bring you guys across my blog in 2018. If you have any questions or own your own home and want to share some of your tips, please pop me a comment below.
Now don’t mind me, I’ll just be over here, pretending to be a fairy princess…

All Rights Reserved - Georgie Glass 2018 ®